Blog

Nepalese Visitors!

We are very lucky to be able to welcome visitors from all over the world to our beautiful school! Here is a blog from Mr Armstrong all about our adventures with our Nepalese Partner School and the impact it has on both of our communities:

After a lot of planning, the time had come to welcome two visitors from our partner school in Dhangadhi, Nepal, for 5 nights before the half term break. Deepak and Sunita had a wonderful time visiting our school and were very grateful to meet so many lovely children, family and staff at Castle Carrock School.

Deepak was extremely interested to visit Castle Carrock and Great Britain, with this being his first trip out of Asia. Similarly, Sunita was equally excited and she was visiting a small, rural school in England for the first time. They both were eager to find out about life in our school, with a huge contrast to their age 5-16 school in Nepal. After discussions, they were interested to see the use of technology, classroom displays, our beautiful surroundings, the attitude and character of our friendly children, amongst many other things. They were keen to take ideas in teaching, resources and learning back home to share with their staff. I am equally excited to see what their school is like, when I visit Dhangadhi later this month.

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Our children were likewise fascinated by what it’s like at the Gurrukul Academy and Nepal in general. We had a great time reading letters from the children about themselves, festival information, food recipes and looking at pictures of the local area. Our children were keen to share information about rainforest animals and provided Deepak and Sunita with some of their work to take home. Additionally, many of the children learnt how to count and write numbers to 20 in Nepalese, which was difficult. In return, the children will share information about local and national festivals, creating pieces of work for me to take to Nepal later in November.

Deepak and Sunita also visited Beamish Museum in Durham, our Harvest Festival, a friend’s farm in Crosby-on-Eden (where Deepak was thoroughly engrossed with the cows and milking, as well as the Shetland ponies), The Lakes, Scotland, Carlisle, Stanwix Primary School, Hadrian’s Wall and even a traditional local pub during their time in the North of England. They tried many traditional British foods such as Fish and Chips, then as a thank-you for having the chance to stay with me, cooked a traditional Nepalese meal the night before they left- which was very tasty.

The experience so far has provided the children, in both schools, with a further chance to find out about people in other countries and a different culture. Children can be very inquisitive and it has been lovely to see the children embrace this opportunity which we have been lucky to have. The children have decided on work that they think would be interesting for the children in Nepal to receive such as creating landscape paintings of our local environments, more letters about us and our hobbies, leaflets about animals in our local habitat as well as many other activities.

I know many parents spoke to Deepak and Sunita after the Harvest Festival and they did want me to pass on messages of thanks for allowing them to feel welcome, as well as to the children for being as charming as ever.

Mr. Armstrong